Friday, March 30, 2012

How to Get Tomato Soup Out of the Can

Via There, I Fixed It, this is pure brilliance right here. If you've ever made canned tomato soup, you need to watch this:


[Vimeo direct link]

13 comments:

  1. I foresee a mild uptick in emergency room visits.

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  2. Harvey, that was friggin' brilliant!

    Imma amaze The Mrs. with this one.

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  3. Damn, that's news? I learned that some fifty years ago.

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  4. Peter - even my dad - who was old enough to be YOUR dad - who taught me to put 2 holes in the can of condensed milk so it wouldn't gurgle & splash - never taught me this trick for tomato soup.

    I'm putting the blame on your generation for not passing this secret along.

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    Replies
    1. It ain't my fault that your daddy didn't teach you that, maybe he didn't think you were ready for sharp objects. Anyhow I taught my kids, and the oldest grandson. The younger grandkids? Their turn will come.

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    2. Actually, your dad did pass this knowledge along to you-- he taught you to put 2 holes in the can. It's just that no one thought to apply this philosophy to the underside of the can in cases like this one.

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  5. My dad was a safety nut, and would have never showed me this! He taught me to just slide a butter knife inside the can between the contents and the side till it touches the bottom. Then the soup or whatever just slides out as air goes in.

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  6. Ugh...he used 'these ones' AHHHHHHHHHHH.

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  7. Which ones, Rave?
    BTW although the concept is great and I shall use it from now on, wouldn't a church key be safer and easier?

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  8. Talnik - a church key would work better on some cans, but with a lot of modern soup cans, the bottom and the sides of the can are formed from a single piece of metal (like the one in the video), so there's no bottom lip to hook the church key on to get enough leverage to puncture the can.

    Some larger cans may still have a lid on both ends, so your idea would work fine on those.

    However, because the modern single-lid can uses thinner metal to save on production and shipping costs, it's easier to puncture with a knife, as illustrated in the video.

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  9. I see...thank you. I guess I was living in the '50's.

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  10. Don't feel bad. I'm old enough to remember when soda cans were made out of steel and had pull tabs.

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